Sam Jones
History Department Chair, World History, AP World History
662-893-3344 ext. 325 
Sam  Jones
Greetings Students and Parents!

My name is Sam Jones and I am absolutely and positively excited to be  your child's U.S., World, and/or AP World History teacher for the 2019-2020 school year! 

Olive Branch High School prepares to celebrate its 107th year of existence in serving the students of eastern DeSoto County!  I am also excited to introduce the F.I.S.H. program in my history classes.  F.I.S.H. is the name of a new literacy and parental involvement initiative I have begun this school year, culminating in newer, more challenging Real Life Connection (RLCs) analysis and discussion, literacy conferences, a video blog, and a brand new Twitter account in which students and parents can exchange information. 

Mike Schmoker, author of the ground-breaking book Focus: Elevating the Essentials to Radically Improve Student Learning, states that social studies, if taught right, should be the most fascinating of all the subjects taught in school.  I have accepted Mr. Schmoker's challenge and making social studies fun, interesting, and relevant to daily life is exactly what F.I.S.H. is all about.  

I am looking so forward to working with you and your child this school year.  If you have any concerns, anything at all, please do not hesitate for a moment to contact me.  

Thank you very much!

Sam Jones
662-893-3344 ext.325

"Always desire to learn something useful."  -Sophocles

About the Teacher

Name:                      Samuel William Jones

Title:                          Instructor, AP World History & U.S. History 1877-present
                                   Department Chair, History & Social Sciences

Birthdate:                 March 27, 1976

Birthplace:                Augsburg, Germany

Education:                Honor Graduate, Southaven High School (1994)
                                   B.A. in Political Science & History, Univ. of Mississippi (1998)
                                   Currently enrolled at Memphis Theological Seminary for MDiv 

At OB Since:            2003

Honors &
Accolades:              - NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFIED TEACHER
                               - Head Fastpitch Softball Coach (2006-2007, 2017-2019)
                               - Director of OBHS Forensics, Speech & Debate Coach (2011-2017)
                               - NSDA Member Coach, Degree of Special Distinction (Double Ruby)
                    - 2014-2015 STAR Teacher
                               - 2010-2011 OBHS Teacher of the Year
                               - November 2013 OBHS Teacher of the Month
                     - OBHS Common Core Content Area Leader (Social Studies)
                               - Certification in Advanced Kagan Cooperative Learning Strategies
                     - Associate Athletic Director (2014-2017)
                               - Head Boys' Soccer Coach (2004-2008) 
                               - 2-time Chickasaw Conference Coach of the Year (2007, 2008)
                               - Awarded the National Honor Roll's Outstanding American 
                                    Teachers for Exceptional Performance in the Motivation and
                                     Empowerment of Today's Youth  (2005-2006)
                               - George Washington Teachers' Institute Scholar (2004)
                               - Voted OBHS' Most Versatile Teacher (2006)
                               - Assistant Girls' Softball Coach (2006)
                               - Received initial AP certification in 2005    

Mr. Jones has been happily married to his wife, Rosemary Jones, since November 2000.   Mrs. Jones currently teaches community-based life skills at OBHS.   They have two children : Patrick (age 16) is a junior at Olive Branch High School, and Lydia (age 12) is a 7th grader at Olive Branch Middle School.  Mr. Jones and his family are members of Maples Memorial United Methodist Church in Olive Branch.  He is a certified candidate for ministry and has been an active member of the Mississippi Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.  Since June 2019, Mr. Jones serves part time as an associate pastor at Maples while attending seminary.  

The entire Jones family bleeds BLUE and GOLD !!!!  OB PRIDE !!                       

Mr. J`s Secrets to a Virtuous Life 

 

 

Mr. Jones’s Secrets to a Virtuous Life

·       Tell your family members you love them every single day.

·       Shower every morning.

·       Always get up when you first awake, no matter what time it is. One hour in the morning is worth two at night!

·       Do everything in a cool, active, and energetic manner.

·       In times of danger or trouble, first think—then act coolly and decisively.

·       Never be idle—always have something to do.

·       Never shrink from an unpleasant duty.

·       Persevere—never give up a thing until you have tried it every possible way. Perseverance is the best school for every manly virtue.

·       Never be prejudiced nor allow yourself to be led by others.

·       If you are in the wrong, acknowledge it frankly.

·       Never harden your conscience.

·       Give up all bad habits.

·       Use no slang language.

·       Speak kindly.

·       Be truthful.

·       Be truly polite.

·       In studying, concentrate your thoughts solely upon the subject before you.

·       Be charitable in thought as well as in action.

Remind Feed

 

 ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY

Mr. Sam Jones, NBCT
Olive Branch High School
Olive Branch, MS


Overview of AP World History

Program:   AP World History is offered to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.   It is anticipated that the majority of students will be sophomores.   Students are enrolled in the course on the basis of teacher recommendations and GPA.   Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP examination.  

Course Information:   AP World History is an academic semester course that meets daily for 90 minutes.   In this course, we will trace the development of world history from the emergence of cities to the present – focusing on the period after 600 C.E. – and emphasizes the analytical and writing skills necessary for success in a college-level history course.   To this end, the course devotes considerable time to the critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources, analysis of historiography, oral presentations, short essays, the development of essays appropriate to: 1.) document-based questions (DBQs) that will be posted on the course website, 2.) long essay questions (LEQ) and 3.) short answer questions (SAQs).   Students are encouraged to join the instructor in the use of a variety of technology in the classroom.  

This course emphasizes student-centered learning.   The vast majority of daily lessons are divided into two segments – lecture and workshops. Lectures are carefully prepared to present outside information or to clarify particularly difficult aspects of the subject matter. On average, lectures occupy 35 – 50 minutes of each class period. The topics of the workshops are also varied.   Methods include role plays, mock trials, debates, seminar discussions, writing labs, cartographic activities, group research, and individual research.  

Course Themes
In this class, we will examine. . .

1.       Interaction Between Humans and the Environment: Demography and disease, Migration, Patterns of settlement, Technology

2.       Development and Interaction of Cultures: Religions, Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies, Science and technology, The arts and architecture

3.       State-building, Expansion, and Conflict: Political structures and forms of governance, Empires, Nations and nationalism, Revolts and revolutions, Regional, transregional, and global structures and organizations

4.       Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems: Agricultural and pastoral production, Trade and commerce, Labor systems, Industrialization, Capitalism, and Socialism

5.       Development and Transformation of Social Structures: Gender roles and relations, Family and kinship, Racial and ethnic constructions, social and economic classes.

Course Grading:
               Period Exams / Essays / Projects / Notebook         50%
                  Quizzes / Homework / Classwork                         30%
               End of Term Exams                                                    20%

AP Test Fee: TBA / See STC for more info.

Course Materials:
           College Level Text: Stearns, Peter, et al. World Civilizations: The Global Experience.                                                            4th ed. Pearson Learning, 2014.

                   

UNIT PLANNER

Period 1:               8000 B.C.E. – 600 B.C.E.
Period 2:                  600 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.
Period 3:                  600 – 1450 C.E.
Period 4:                  1450 – 1750 C.E.
Period 5:                  1750 – 1900 C.E.
Period 6:                  1900 – present

 

PERIOD ONE

Technological and Environmental Transformations : 8,000 BCE to 600 BCE will last approximately 1 week.

Period 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, to c. 600 BCE

• Key Concept 1.1. Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

• Key Concept 1.2. The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies

• Key Concept 1.3. The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural,

• Pastoral and Urban Societies [CR3]

We will use the panorama lesson on the “World History For Us All” website that provides archaeological data compiled from real

archaeological sites in the Czech Republic, the Ukraine, and Russia. Archaeologists date them

to between about 28,000 and 14,000 years. We will use that data to analyze what archeology

can tell us about the effects of the shift to agriculture and pastoralism on economic and

social systems, on environmental and technological changes, and on the development of

patriarchy. These lessons address Themes 1, 4, and 5. [CR1b] [CR4] & [CR15]

 

PERIOD TWO

Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies : 600 BCE to 600 CE will last approximately 3 weeks.

• Period 2: Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies, c. 600 BCE to c. 600 CE

• Key Concept 2.1. The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions

• Key Concept 2.2. The Development of States and Empires

• Key Concept 2.3. Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and

Exchange [CR3]

We will conduct a simulation of ancient Greek democracy and study the architectural

achievements of Greek, Roman, Persian, and South Asian societies and the ways they have

endured in design through today. We will spend about one week examining the emergence

of the major belief systems that became more dominant during this era as well as the effects

the spread of those belief systems had on social structures and gender roles. Sample

assignments include: Societal Comparisons (China, India, Mediterranean), Leader Analyses

(Ashoka, Pericles), Change and Continuity Analyses (development of new types of irrigation

systems and the spread of crops, expansion of pastoral nomadic groups in Central Asia), and

map exercises on ancient conceptions of the world. These lessons address Themes 1, 2, 3, 4,

and 5. [CR5e]

 

 

PERIOD THREE

Regional and Interregional Interactions : 600-1450 will last approximately 4 weeks.

• Key Concept 3.1: Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange

Networks

• Key Concept 3.2: Continuity and Innovation in State Forms and Their Interactions

• Key Concept 3.3: Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences

We will analyze images and textual sources used in documentaries on the beginnings of

Islam and the Islamic Empires, create annotated diagrams of the dynastic cycle of the Tang

and Song dynasties, compare the development of polities in Mesoamerica and in the Andes,

and examine The Song of Roland as a poetic (though historically inaccurate) homage to

Charlemagne’s role in nascent French national identity. In small groups, students will research

and present on Genghis Khan, Viking and Polynesian migrations, and Byzantine art and

architecture. Sample assignments include Leader Analysis (Harun al-Rashid, Charlemagne,

Mansa Musa, Montezuma I), Change and Continuity Analysis (effects of the bubonic plague

in Europe, North Africa, Middle East, and China), Conflict Analyses (Sunni/Shiite, Byzantine/

Roman Catholic, Mahayana and Neo-Confucianism, Crusades), and map exercises tracing

economic and technological developments in long-distance trading networks in AfroEurasia

and Bantu migrations. These lessons address Themes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. [CR5a], [CR5b], [CR5c]

& [CR5d]

 

PERIOD FOUR

Global Interactions : 1450-1750 will last approximately 4 weeks.

• Key Concept 4.1: Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

• Key Concept 4.2: New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

• Key Concept 4.3: State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

We will examine an online art museum to examine the characteristics of and influences on Italian

Renaissance art. We will participate in discussions of different approaches art

historians have toward the analysis of Italian Renaissance art. We may watch the feature film

“The Mission” to analyze the conflicts among European missionaries, European colonists,

and indigenous peoples in South America and the new cultures that resulted. We will

explore the global reach of the Columbian exchange in historic and contemporary regional

cuisines by preparing and sampling meals that show the syncretism in cuisines from the

15th century to today. Sample assignments include: Change and Continuity Analysis

(Columbian Exchange, European involvement in Asian trading networks), Conflict Analysis

(English Civil War, Tokugawa Seclusion policies, and decentralization in the Mughal Empire),

Leader Analysis (Peter the Great, Suleiman the Great, and Qianlong), and map exercises on

European maritime expansion and Polynesian migrations. These lessons address Themes 1,

2, 3, 4, and 5. [CR5c] & [CR5e]

  

PERIOD FIVE

Industrialization and Global Integration : 1750-1900 will last approximately 4 weeks.

• Key Concept 5.1: Industrialization and Global Capitalism

• Key Concept 5.2: Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

• Key Concept 5.3: Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform

• Key Concept 5.4: Global Migration

We will analyze a documentary on imperialism in Africa with a focus on how Queen Victoria’s

reign affected the geo-political, social, and cultural implications of European eventual

domination of Africa. [CR13] We will use a documentary on Napoleon Bonaparte, to defend

or refute the statement, “Napoleon was a great man.” The unit’s work will also include a

comparative analysis of Latin American independence movements. Sample assignments

include: Change Analysis (steam engine, pencil, telegraph), Conflict Analyses (Zulu Wars,

Boer War, Spanish American War, Taiping Rebellion), and Leader Analyses (Queen Victoria,

Muhammad Ali, Toussaint L’Ouverture), and map exercises investigating connections

between imperialism and industrialization. These lessons address Themes 1, 4, and 5. [CR4]

PERIOD SIX

Accelerating Global Change and Realignments : 1900-present will last approximately 3 weeks.

• Key Concept 6.1: Science and the Environment

• Key Concept 6.2: Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

• Key Concept 6.3: New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society, and Culture [CR3]

We will examine the world wars to identify the interconnectedness of the major events of

this century, as well as their influence on our contemporary world. We will spend at least half

of the unit examining the independence movements in Africa, Asia, and Oceania after World

War II and various political and social revolutions in Latin America. Sample assignments

include: Change and Continuity Analyses (modern medicine, television, automobile,

computer), Conflict Analyses (world wars, Cambodian genocide, European labor strikes),

Leader Analyses (Stalin, Mao Zedong, Indira Gandhi, Golda Meir, Oscar Romero, Nkrumah,

Kenyatta, and Mandela). Finally, you will re-examine your start-of-the-year assessment

of the state of the world, this time considering the role of history and whether a deeper

understanding of prior events alter or reinforce your previous conclusions. These lessons

address Themes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

 

 

WEEKDATESPERIODTOPICS COVEREDCHAPTERS
 JAN 3 - 41 & 2INTRO. TO COURSE / INFO. REGARDING AP WH EXAM 
1JAN 7 - 111 & 2PREHISTORY & EARLY CIVILIZATIONS1
2JAN 14 - 181 & 2CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS : CHINA, INDIA, MEDITERRANEAN2-3-4-5
 JAN 21 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. HOLIDAY 
3JAN 22 - 253WORLD RELIGIONS, SPREAD OF ISLAM, AFRICA & ASIA6-7-8
4JAN 28 - FEB 13EASTERN EUROPE: BYZANTIUM, ORTHODOX & WESTERN EUROPE9-10
5FEB 4 - 83AZTEC, INCA, TANG & SONG CHINA, JAPAN, KOREA, VIETNAM11-12-13
6FEB 11 - 143MONGOL WEEK! GENGHIS KHAN & THE CONQUEST OF THE KNOWN WORLD14-15
 FEB 15 / FEB 18 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT / PRESIDENTS DAY HOLIDAY 
7FEB 19 - 224COLOMBIAN EXCHANGE & THE WORLD ECONOMY16-17
8FEB 25 - MAR 14EARLY LATIN AMERICA, AFRICA, ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE19-20
9MAR 4 - 84RISE OF RUSSIA, THE MUSLIM EMPIRES / MIDTERM EXAM18-21-22
 MAR 11 - 15 SPRING BREAK 
10MAR 18 - 224 & 5ASIAN TRANSITIONS, GLOBAL CHANGES IN 175022 - 23
11MAR 25 - 295INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, IMPERIALISM, EUROPE'S NEW ORDER24
12APR 1 - 55LATIN AMERICAN CONSOLIDATION, RUSSIA AND JAPAN25-27
13APR 8 - 125OTTOMAN EMPIRE, ISLAMIC HEARTLAND, QING CHINA26
14APR 15 - 185WORLD WAR I AND THE BREAKDOWN OF THE EUROPEAN ORDER28-29
 APR 19 / APR 22 GOOD FRIDAY / EASTER HOLIDAY 
15APR 23 - 266BETWEEN WORLD WARS, DEPRESSION, AND WORLD WAR II29-30-31
16APR 29 - MAY 36THE COLD WAR AROUND THE WORLD, INDEPENDENCE IN AFRICA & MIDDLE EAST32-33-34
17MAY 6 - 106NATION BUILDING IN THE 21ST CENTURY / AP EXAM REVIEW35-36
18MAY 13 - 17 AP WORLD HISTORY EXAM - MAY 16TH @ 8:00AM 
 MAY 20 - 22 FINAL EXAMS